Monday, October 10, 2016

Rett's Flower Square Pattern




Here's another pattern I have been working on. I'm making a granny square sampler blanket at the moment, making up my own designs as I go. This sunny flower has been one of my favourite squares so far, so I experimented with it a bit more, made some improvements, and ended up with this pattern.

Here's a picture of my blanket so far. I'm having so much fun with this project!


Anyway, back to the pattern. This is a similar design to my Flower Bunting Pattern. As I explained in that post, I'm very much a beginner at this pattern writing thing, so if you try it I would love your feedback.


Rett's Flower Square (UK terms)

I used 8ply (DK) yarn, a 4mm hook and 6 colours.

My finished square measured 15cm (6 inch).

This pattern uses UK terms, and the following stitches:

(US terms are in brackets)

sl st - slip stitch

ch - chain

dc - double crochet  (sc)

tr - treble (dc)

dtr - double treble (tr)
dtr4tog - double treble 4 together (tr4tog)
htr - half treble (hdc)
hdtr - half double treble (htr)


I haven't explained how to do these stitches, or join colours, as there are plenty of tutorials already out there for these things!




FOUNDATION RING: Using colour number 1, ch 4 and join with sl st to form a ring.

ROUND 1: Ch 3 (counts as 1 tr), 11 tr into the ring, join with sl st into 3rd ch of ch 3. Fasten off. You should have 12tr altogether.


foundation ring and round 1

ROUND 2: Using colour number 2, ch 4 into any tr from round 1, 1 dtr into same stitch. 2 dtr into each stitch to end, join with sl st into 4th of ch 4. Fasten off. You should have 12 pairs (24 dtr altogether).

Depending on your yarn and tension, this round may curl up a little. Mine "cups" a bit, but flattens out with the next round. If you find your circle curling too much, try using hdtr instead of dtr.

round 2

ROUND 3: Using colour number 3, ch 3 in the space between any two of the dtr pairs, 1 tr in the same space. 2 tr in space between each dtr to end. Join with a sl st into 4th ch of ch 4. Fasten off. You should have 48 tr altogether.


round 3

ROUND 4: Using colour number 4, dc in the space between any two of the tr from round 3 (I make a dc standing stitch to start this round), chain 3, *skip the next two spaces, dc in the third space, ch 3, continue from * to end. Join with a sl st to the top of the first dc. Fasten off. You should have 16 dc.


round 4

ROUND 5: Using the same colour as the last round, starting in any 3 chain space, ch 3 or 4 (to form first dtr of the cluster - usually ch 4 is used with dtr, but for these petals I find ch 3 fits the shape better), dtr3tog in the same space (this forms your first dtr4tog), ch 3, *dtr4tog, ch 3, repeat from * to end, join with a sl st in the top of the first cluster. Fasten off. You should have 16 petals.


round 5

ROUND 6: Using colour number 5, *4 dc in any chain space (I use a standing dc for the first stitch here too), 2 htr and 2 tr in next chain space, 2 hdtr, 2 dtr, ch 3, 2 dtr, 2 hdtr in next chain space (this forms a corner), 2 tr and 2 htr in next chain space. Repeat from * three times to form the rest of the square. Join with sl st to the top of the first dc, fasten off.

This part of the pattern is similar to Round 5 of the Flower Bunting pattern, so the diagram there might help, but please note that there is no ch 1 in between the sets of four stitches in this pattern.


round 6

ROUND 7: Using colour number 6 and working in any corner space, ch 6 (to form one tr and ch 3 corner space), 2 tr in same space, 1 tr in top of each stitch to next corner space. *2 tr, ch 3, 2 tr in corner space, 1 tr in top of each stitch to next corner. Repeat from * to form next three sides. Finish with 1 tr in the first corner space beside the starting chain. Join with a sl st in the 3 ch of ch6 (this becomes the 2nd tr of that set). Fasten off. You should have 24 tr along each side.


round 7

And that's it! I have made several of these now, so I think I'll make a cushion out of them. I'll share a photo of it when it's finished.

I used Biggan Design 8 ply wool for my square, in the following colours:
Scarlet, Coral Red, Bright Orange, Saffron, Turquoise and Deep Turquoise.




I would love to see what you do with your squares!

Share them with me at:


Please tag your pics #rettsflowersquare so I can find them :)

Friday, October 07, 2016

Rett's Flower Bunting pattern

I've been playing around with new designs for my Hippie Granny Bunting, and was pretty happy with this cute flower one, so I thought I'd share it with you!

CONFESSION TIME:

This is actually my first "published" pattern! I have been procrastinating about writing patterns for a couple of years, and have lots of almost-finished ones that I need to get tested and out there.

A big part of my problem is perfectionism, but if we wait until we are experts at doing something before we do it, when will it ever get done? So I'm setting this one free, as is, untested (except by me)!

Please try it out and let me know how it goes. I usually make up my own designs and don't actually read a lot of patterns, so my crochet language is a bit awkward. I'll keep working on it, but in the meantime I'd love your feedback and suggestions. It will be very helpful to me in getting my other designs out there :)


Rett's Flower Bunting (UK terms)

I used 8ply (DK) yarn, a 4mm hook and 6 colours.

This pattern uses UK terms, and the following stitches:
(US terms are in brackets)

sl st - slip stitch
ch - chain
dc - double crochet  (sc)
tr - treble (dc)
dtr - double treble (tr)
dtr3tog - double treble 3 together (tr3tog)
htr - half treble (hdc)
hdtr - half double treble (htr)

I haven't explained how to do these stitches, or join colours, as there are plenty of tutorials already out there for these things!


FOUNDATION RING: Using colour number 1, ch 4 and join with sl st to form a ring.

ROUND 1: Ch 3 (counts as 1 tr), 11 tr into the ring, join with sl st into 3rd ch of ch 3. Fasten off.

foundation chain and round 1

ROUND 2: Using colour number 2, ch 3 into any tr from round 1, 1 tr into same stitch. 2 tr into each stitch to end, join with sl st into 3rd of ch 3. Fasten off. You should have 12 pairs (24 tr altogether).

round 2


ROUND 3: Using colour number 3, dc in the space between two of the tr pairs (I make a dc standing stitch to start this round), chain 3, *dc in the next space between two tr pairs, ch 3, continue from * to end. Join with a sl st to the top of the first dc. Fasten off.

round 3

ROUND 4: Using the same colour as the last round, starting in any 3 chain space, ch 3 (to form first dtr of the cluster), dtr2tog in the same space (this forms your first dtr3tog), ch 3, *dtr3tog, ch 3, repeat from * to end, join with a sl st in the top of the first cluster. Fasten off.

If you look carefully at my photo below, you can see how the first petal at the top is actually made up of 3 chain and a dtr2tog, but the rest of the petals are dtr3tog. If you know a better way to do this or explain it, please let me know :)

round 4

ROUND 5: Using colour number 4, *4 dc in any chain space (I use a standing dc for the first stitch here too), ch 1. 2 htr and 2 tr in next chain space, ch 1. 2 hdtr, 2 dtr, ch 3, 2 dtr, 2 hdtr in next chain space (this forms a corner), ch 1. 2 tr, 2 htr in next chain space, ch 1. Repeat from * twice to form the rest of the triangle. Join with sl st to the top of the first dc, fasten off.

PHEW, there must be an easier way to say that! Does it make any sense at all? This is where we turn the circle into a triangle, and I promise it's much easier to do than to explain! If you're a visual person like me, the picture might help.

round 5

ROUND 6: Using colour number 5 and working in any corner space, ch 6 (to form one tr and ch 3 corner space), 4 tr, ch 1,* 4 tr in next chain space, ch 1, continue from * to next corner space. **4 tr, ch 3, 4 tr in corner space, ch 1, 4 tr in next 4 chain spaces, with ch 1 between each set of 4 tr. Repeat from **. Finish with 3 tr in the first corner space, join with a sl st in the 3 ch of ch6 (this forms the 4th tr of that set). Fasten off.

I start this round in a corner as it looks neater to me, but you can start in any chain space, and adjust the pattern accordingly. This round is pretty much a basic granny triangle pattern.


round 6


ROUND 7: Using colour number 6, 1 dc in every stitch and ch space from round 6 to form border. (I use a standing dc for the first stitch here too). 3 dc in each corner space. Join with sl st to the top of the first dc. Fasten off.

round 7

And you're done! The finished triangle might be a little wavy along the edges, so you can block it into a neater triangle if you like.

My crocheting is quite tight, but if you are a loose crocheter, you might be able to skip the ch 1 between your granny clusters to make a neater triangle. Experiment, and let me know how you go!

When I have enough triangles to make a garland (mine are usually between 9 and 11 triangles long, but that is totally up to you), join them with dc along the top. I use two to three rows of dc.

joining the triangles

If you want to add tassels to your bunting, I have a tassels tutorial that might help.



I would love to see pictures of your finished triangles!

Share them with me at:


Please tag your pics #rettsflowerbunting so I can find them :)

Saturday, July 30, 2016

Yarntopia

Yarntopia was created by the Warwick Art Gallery yarnbombing team as a cosy oasis for 2016 Jumpers and Jazz in July festival goers to enjoy.
The combined effort of around 120 people, Yarntopia is made up of over 1300 crocheted and knitted squares, more than 300 diamonds, hundreds of metres of vines and fabulous yarn art pieces from our talented team members.
I had so much fun designing and coordinating this project, and had the most wonderful team to work with. Although we receive contributions from a large number of people, the group who do all the sewing together of those hundreds and thousands of pieces, then climb ladders and sit on cold concrete to install everything is quite small. They have worked so hard to bring this to fruition, and I feel so lucky to have their support and friendship. Thank you so much to everyone involved!!

We are still in the middle of the festival and time is short, so I will be back to add more information and acknowledgements to these photos when things quieten down. In the meantime, enjoy our Yarntopia!






























Wednesday, May 06, 2015

time and light



Time you enjoy wasting is not wasted time.        

As Winter approaches and the days get shorter that uncomfortable feeling of never having enough time can infiltrate my thinking if I'm not careful.  I find myself trying to make up for it by attempting to work on too many things at once.  I end up feeling scattered and overwhelmed and struggle to actually finish anything. 




Vladimir Nabokov had a wonderful concept he referred to as unreal estate - an inheritance from his mother of an appreciation for the beauty of intangible property.

'Vot zapomni [now remember],' she would say in conspiratorial tones as she drew my attention to this or that loved thing in Vyra - a lark ascending the curds-and-whey sky of a dull spring day, heat lightning taking pictures of a distant line of trees in the night, the palette of maple leaves on brown sand, a small bird's cuneate footprints on new snow.

Vladimir Nabokov,  Speak, Memory

When I think about the unreal estate I have inherited, I remember all the unscheduled time I enjoyed as a child - playing in the backyard, swimming, reading, drawing, cloud-gazing, making wishes on dandelions and sitting in the grass looking for four leaf clovers.  As an adult, when I allow myself to "waste" a little bit of my own time, suddenly it feels like it's not such a scarce commodity.  I'm reminded of the days of my childhood that somehow always seemed longer.

Sweet childish days, that were as long
As twenty days are now.


William Wordsworth, To a Butterfly

So this morning I rearranged my priorities; putting time and sunlight at the top of my to-do list, and enjoyed the ephemeral beauty of the Autumn leaves in our garden.  The result was a little bit of Andy Goldsworthy inspired art.  I cheated a bit by utilising the holes in an old garden chair to position the leaves, but it still wasn't long before the breeze took them away.

   



The Word 
Tony Hoagland

Down near the bottom
of the crossed-out list
of things you have to do today,

between "green thread"
and "broccoli," you find
that you have pencilled "sunlight."

Resting on the page, the word
is beautiful. It touches you
as if you had a friend

and sunlight were a present
he had sent from someplace distant
as this morning—to cheer you up,

and to remind you that,
among your duties, pleasure
is a thing

that also needs accomplishing.
Do you remember?
that time and light are kinds

of love, and love
is no less practical
than a coffee grinder

or a safe spare tire?
Tomorrow you may be utterly
without a clue,

but today you get a telegram
from the heart in exile,
proclaiming that the kingdom

still exists,
the king and queen alive,
still speaking to their children,

—to any one among them
who can find the time
to sit out in the sun and listen.

"The Word" by Tony Hoagland, from Sweet Ruin. © University of Wisconsin Press, 1992.

Monday, May 04, 2015

It scattered the night


It scattered the night is a companion piece to Still I Rise, and has been on my desk for a month or maybe more.  I've been collecting ideas and bits of imagery about sunrises, sparkling skies and warm light, and this is what came out of them.  Rather than try to gather my scattered thoughts today, I thought I would show its progress from start to finish, along with the quotes I've collected in my journal while working on it.


  

The sun - the bright sun, that brings back, not light alone, but new life, and hope, and freshness to man - burst upon the crowded city in clear and radiant glory. Through costly-coloured glass and paper-mended window, through cathedral dome and rotten crevice, it shed its equal ray.
Charles Dickens, Oliver Twist



Daylight, full of small dancing particles
and the one great turning, our souls
are dancing with you, without feet, they dance.
Can you see them when I whisper in your ear?
Rumi


Images of broken light which dance before me like a million eyes
John Lennon



All this he saw, for one moment breathless and intense, vivid on the morning sky; and still, as he looked he lived; and still, as he lived, he wondered.
Kenneth Grahame, The Wind in the Willows



I love the colour legends in old atlases, and often use them for inspiration in my paintings.

It is not down on any map; true places never are.
Herman Melville, Moby-Dick


It scattered the night, Loretta Grayson 2015
Gouache on cotton rag paper, 23cm x 28cm

 
It was only a sunny smile, and little it cost in the giving, but like morning light it scattered the night and made the day worth living.
F. Scott Fitzgerald